Chevrolet


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I’m browsing through the net and I happened to found this interesting topic.

Cars.com, one of the most trusted websites that offer automotive pricing and other information provide consumers some info about the vehicle models that are “wallet-friendly”. Why wallet friendly? Well, it is because these car models costs less than or bigger than $10,000.

Patrick Olsen, managing editor of Cars.com said:

“Whether it’s a thrifty ride for a college student, a grocery-getter for the family or something for the daily commute, lots of shoppers seem to want the same thing: a late-model, low-mileage car that’s reliable, safe and fuel-efficient.”

Top 10 best inexpensive used cars according to Cars.com.

2005 Ford Focus ($10,500 – $13,000)

“The restyled 2005 Ford Focus offers nimble handling with few of the equipment recalls that beset the early-2000s original. “

2003 Ford Taurus ($10,500 – $12,000)

“The Ford Taurus is a sound used-car choice for families and sensible for young drivers. Both the wagon and sedan offer generous cabin and luggage space, not to mention top reliability and crash-test scores.”

2003 Mazda Prot̩g̩ ($8,500 Р$15,000)

“Those wary of Honda Civic and Toyota Corolla homogeny should consider the Mazda Protege.”

2003 Mercury Sable ($9,000 – $13,000)

“The Ford Taurus’ upscale twin offers slightly better reliability ratings and the same stalwart crash-test scores.”

2002 Buick LeSabre ($9,000 – $12,000)

“The Buick LeSabre is a comfortable car for drivers young and old, and the ’02 model came chock full of safety features.”

2002 Chevrolet Impala ($9,000 – $11,500)

“The Impala is Chevy’s workaday sedan, and the 2000-05 iteration arguably boasted sharper styling than its anonymous successor.”

2002 Ford Windstar ($7,500 – $15,000)

“Minivan lovers can fill the Ford Windstar with up to seven people, and there are plenty of bells and whistles for those who want them.”

2002 Honda Accord ($10,000 – $13,000)

“The sixth generation, built from 1998 through 2002, delivered excellent reliability and respectable crash-test ratings.”

2002 Honda Civic ($10,000 – $12,000)

“The Honda Civic combines thriftiness and refinement in a way few others can, making it an excellent choice for those who often drive solo.”

2002 Oldsmobile Aurora ($10,000 – $13,000)

“The Oldsmobile Aurora is proof you can buy a used luxury car for around $10,000. The restyled early-2000s model earns high marks for reliability and crashworthiness.”

Some of the Detroit automakers have started their endeavor of producing plug-in hybrids to contribute to a cleaner and greener environment. With the increasing demand for fuel-efficient cars, automakers are given no wider leeway but to build more hybrids and flex-fuel vehicles.

“Spiteful” fuel legislations, rising gasoline prices, and costly plug-ins production costs are deemed major obstacles in the industry.

Additionally, the researchers factored in a period of time for plug-in sales to ramp up. Chevrolet, Saturn and Toyota are among the automakers experimenting with plug-in hybrids.

The General Motors Corp. is on top of the list of automakers engaged in plug-in hybrids. Saturn might well be the first one to sell a plug-in. Plug-ins do have some big problems to overcome: the added cost, weight and cargo space of the batteries they must house; the limited range of the batteries when charged; and the impact on the power grid from millions of people plugging in their cars, reported MSNBC.

Mike Omotoso, a senior manager at the market research firm J.D. Power and Associates, said that he thinks widespread electricity demand for cars has the potential to be an issue. “We haven’t looked at that sort of extreme scenario in terms of that level of volume for plug-ins, but the increased demand would possibly put a strain on the grid, especially in places like California that are already under strain some times of the year, like in peak summer periods with everyone using their air-conditioning,” he said.